UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING BIODIVERSITY INSTITUTE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP: RAPTORS IN WYOMING AND THE WEST


A call for proposals
June 2017

The University of Wyoming’s Biodiversity Institute (BI) fosters the understanding, appreciation, and conservation of biological diversity through research, education, and outreach. The success of the BI depends on close collaboration with scientists and natural resource practitioners throughout the state and region. This solicitation is to fund personnel external to the BI to advance the unit’s core mission, with a particular focus on raptors in Wyoming and the region.

Wyoming is a stronghold for raptor populations in western North America. While surrounding states have experienced declines in many species, the relatively undisturbed landscapes of Wyoming allow many populations of raptors to thrive. Nonetheless, Wyoming raptors face several challenges. The BI recognizes a need for an effective summary of the state-of-science regarding raptors in the region, with special attention to questions of most importance to land and wildlife managers and policy-makers, to advance effective and efficient conservation.

It may be that some questions of high priority to raptor conservation have already been answered by scientists, but that information is not accessible for efficient application by managers and policy-makers.  It is also possible that other important questions could be addressed relatively quickly with novel research, but have not yet been clearly identified as priorities to the research community.  These possibilities are embedded in a dynamic research and management environment, with several ongoing research efforts, working groups, and management consortia developing information and addressing different parts of the raptor conservation picture simultaneously.         

The BI will provide funds to support a researcher to investigate and clarify this complex scene, with the main goals of:  (1) identifying important issues of applied raptor ecology that already have strong scientific understanding; (2) synthesizing that information in effective ways for application by managers and policy-makers; (3) identifying other priority questions that could, if addressed through novel research, advance raptor management and conservation in the near term; and (4) discover and present opportunities for synergy among ongoing raptor conservation and management efforts.

All questions should be directed to Gary Beauvais (beauvais@uwyo.edu) or Brian Barber (bbarber4@uwyo.edu).

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© 2017 University of Wyoming Biodiversity Institute.